This is an introduction to the fundamental ideas of computers and their implementation: office applications (word processor, spread sheet, presentation and database), elementary website design, blogging, Internet use for research (hardware, software, early pioneers of the computing industry, common terminology, etc.) and some elementary programming. Instructors may include other appropriate topics. Both Windows and MAC OS will be utilized. Prerequisite: MAT 101, a placement test score indicating mastery of the MAT 101 material, or permission of instructor; Offered both semesters; (Not open to those with credit in CSC 151.)

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Prerequisites: CSC 110 or CSC 151, and MAT 101 or a placement test score indicating mastery of the MAT 101 material, or permission of instructor; Not open to those who have taken MAT 120.

This course is an examination of human conduct and responsibility and the relationships between individuals and society. Offered in the fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite: at least sophomore status

The nature and principles of religious ethics in the Judeo-Christian tradition are explored with an emphasis on historical and contemporary attitudes of religion toward social responsibility. Topics for discussion include: sexuality, identity, power, violence, war, racism and medical ethics. Satisfies the core requirement for ethics. Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Offered both semesters.

This course focuses on the nature and theory of management. It emphasizes the functional application of the basic principles of management to realistic business situations. Offered in the fall and spring semesters.

This is a course that introduces the student to formal research methodology. The course includes discussion of research designs, components of a research study and appropriate documentation of the research report emphasis is placed on problem identification, hypothesis formation, assumptions, and limitations, sampling concepts, use of human subjects, methodology, statistical selections and conclusions. Concepts are illustrated with current nursing research studies.

This course is the second of two courses for students who are already registered nurses. The course will focus on the health needs of individuals, families and groups with a major focus on population-based care of communities. These needs are primarily addressed by studying community health issues related to addictions, violence, trauma and complex mental issues; management and leadership; and nursing care of the older adult These topics are addressed through three learning modules. The roles of professional nurse as a manager, primary care provider, gatekeeper and collaborator within the interdisciplinary health team are emphasized Research findings are analyzed to evaluate health care in relation to outcomes and cost effectiveness. Included is a focus on developing solutions to problems identified in the analysis of the impact of changes on a health care systems or department's strengths and weaknesses in improving quality, cost effective care. Prerequisite: RN license and CPR Certification required for entry; Co-requisite: NUR 460 RNL; Distance learning format available based on enrollment; Offered in the fall semester.

This course is the second of two clinical courses for students who are already registered nurses. Clinical experiences are in a variety of settings to provide students with the opportunity to develop their know ledge and skill in practicing population focused nursing care. Students will be responsible for obtaining experiences that incorporates community health nursing. Clinical assignments will include a variety of independent experiences as validated by the student's portfolio. Prerequisite: RN license and CPR Certification required for entry; Co-requisite: NUR 460 RN: Distance learning format available based on enrollment; Offered in the fall semester.

This course deals with working with staff, understanding dynamics of human behavior, goal setting and problem-solving techniques. Prerequisite: MGT 305 or permission of the instructor; Offered as needed.

This course deals with the nature and theory of human resources management. It emphasizes the functional application of the basic principles of human resources management to realistic organizational situations. Prerequisite or corequisite: MGT 305

This course is the first of two courses for students who are already registered nurses. The focus is on enhancing the students’ knowledge and skills in using nursing theory, utilizing information technology, applying health education theories, and working with interdisciplinary managed care in the health care system when planning care for individuals across the lifespan, families and groups. The roles of the nurse in health promotion, restoration, and maintenance, and as a manager who collaborates with members of the multidisciplinary team, are examined emphasis is placed on identifying problems, which need to be addressed through research, and on examining cultural, environmental, political, and economical factors influencing the health care system The course also includes work on writing skills and, together with the clinical course NUR 440 RNL, meets the requirements for one of the two required courses for the Writing Intensive Program (WIP). Prerequisite: RN license and CPR Certification required for entry; Corequisite: NUR 440 RNL; Distance learning format available based on enrollment; Offered in the spring semester.

This course is the first of two clinical courses for students who are already registered nurses. The focus is on providing students opportunities to practice using nursing theories, utilizing information technology, applying health educational theories, and understanding the concept of interdisciplinary managed care when promoting partnerships to enhance the health of individuals across the lifespan, families and groups. Clinical assignments will include a variety of independent experiences where students will develop materials within their portfolio to validate their accomplishment of the course outcomes. Along with NUR 440RN, students successfully completing this clinical will meet the requirements for one of the two required courses for the Writing Intensive Program. Prerequisite: RN license and CPR Certification required for entry; Co-requisite: NUR 440 RN: Distance learning format available based on enrollment• Offered in the spring semester

This course surveys the origins and growth of the Confucian, Islamic and Western worlds, and examines how a concentration of political and economic ideas and technologies allowed temporary Western dominance. This course meets the core requirement in history. Offered both semesters.

This is a course that examines the economic, social and cultural events that shaped American history from colonial times to 1865. Attention is given to race relations and problems of minority groups. This course meets the core requirement in history. Offered in the fall semester.

This is a course that examines the economic, social and cultural events that have shaped American history from 1865 to the present. Attention is given to race relations and problems of minority groups. (This course meets the core requirement in history.) Offered in the spring semester.

This course is a survey of the development of Western culture as divided into seven major epochs: Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the 19th century and the 20th century. This course meets the core requirement in history. Offered both semesters.

This course is a study of the American political and economic systems including the theories underlying them, political parties, pressure groups, the money system, the credit system and the relations between government and the economy. This course meets the core requirement in political science/economics. Offered in the fall and spring semesters.

This course explores the price system, public and private sectors, national income accounting, unemployment and inflation, fiscal policy, budget deficits and the public debt, money and banking and the Federal Reserve and monetary policy. This course meets the social sciences requirement in the core.

This course explores supply and demand and the elasticity of supply and demand. It analyzes the degree and nature of competition in various market structures, the economic benefits derived from and the problems presented by big business conglomerates and multinationals and international trade and finance. The course meets the social sciences requirement in the core.

This seminar course presents a critical analysis of the advanced practice roles in the nursing profession. The scope of practice of both clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners are analyzed. The legal and ethical implications of these roles are examined The roles are further explored in terms of how they are influenced by the social, economic, political, cultural, environmental, historical and geographic forces and trends of the times. Increasing the public’s accessibility to advanced practice nursing care through innovative programs, especially through entrepreneurship and grant writing is explored. Means to enhance advanced practice nursing are also analyzed Open to students in the RN program, five-year MS in nursing program or with graduate standing; Offered in the spring and fall semesters

Two Year Completion Plan

Year 1 Courses Year 2 Courses
First Semester - 16 Credits First Semester - 12 Credits
Second Semester - 14 Credits Second Semester - 15 Credits
Summer Semester - 12 Credits